Race

The Man, His Work, and Its Impact–The Dr. Seuss Controversy

Posted by on Nov 3, 2017 in Children's Literature, Illustration, Race | 0 comments

B8OSR0HIEAIvoty

Not one of Dr. Seuss’s finer moments. He did get better.

Maybe you’re not up on what’s going on with Dr. Seuss? For details of the current controversy, check out this and this.

I was going to post my thoughts, but I have to take a back seat to Grace Lin here: she says everything that needs to be said, thoughtfully and wisely and eloquently.

A few highlights:

We know that Dr. Seuss’s early career is filled with creations of racist propaganda. He drew horrible stereotypes against Jews, African-Americans–you name it…. However, as time passed, Geisel began to regret his earlier images. It is widely accepted that his beloved book, “Horton Hears a Who!” was his way of apologizing for his earlier art….That is what makes Geisel a good man and artist. Because he was willing to grow from his original mindset, realize the harm the his work could do and get better.

No artist deserves to be judged and dismissed on the basis of one work or one image. No artist gets to be judged and idolized only on the works he or she would prefer to be selected.

 

Read More

The Secrets the Seven

Posted by on Jul 12, 2017 in American History, BOOK: The Eagle's Quill, Book: The Eureka Key, Historical Fiction, Race, Secrets of the Seven, SERIES: Secrets of the Seven | 0 comments

Living descendants of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence recite it!These folks seem like characters from The Secrets of the Seven. If we cast the movie, this is what it might look like. (Except we’d need to add in some kids, of course.)

Read More

Books = Change = Hope

Posted by on Apr 11, 2017 in Childhood, Children's Literature, Educators & Librarians, Race | 0 comments

Read More

McArthur School

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in Educators & Librarians, Events, Race, School Visits | 0 comments

IMG_8597Last Friday I did a round of poetry workshops with some of the classes at a McArthur Elementary. I snapped a picture of this fabulous quilt hanging up in the main office.

I loved the energy and excitement of the kids as they listened to poems and tried writing their own. Especially the Asian girl who earnestly asked for the right English adjective to describe quick, happy, upbeat music (she was pleased with my suggestion of “lively”) and then proudly read her poem aloud in her tentative English; the Hispanic girl who wrinkled her nose a bit at my Spanish accent but still smiled at me to make sure she wouldn’t hurt my feelings; the Caucasian boy who squirmed throughout my presentation until I thought he was bored out of his skull and then blew me away with one of the best poems I’ve heard; the Middle Eastern girl who hugged me and said she could now check “hugging an author” off her bucket list.

It was lovely to see all these bright, eager, American face light up with joy to be talking about artwork and writing poems.

Read More