Reviews

What Reviewers Are Saying

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in Book: Deadly Flowers, Reviews | 0 comments

Deadly Flowers

Deadly Flowers

…about Deadly Flowers:

“As [Kata] learns to rely on her new traveling companions and others who reach out to help them along the way, she begins to question some of her long held beliefs. Rather than trusting no one, she learns to decipher who is trustworthy, and instead of blind obedience to a master, she starts to wonder if freedom from any master is possible. This journey through feudal Japan and its hero folklore is reminiscent of some of Lloyd Alexander’s works. Ninja fans and others will fall in love with this daring, determined, and silent warrior.”
–Children’s Literature

“This is a great fantasy/historical/adventure mashup of a book. And I love that it is a female protagonist that has to think, act, and save the day. Seriously, this is one great adventure story. Just watch out for all those pesky (and sometimes evil) demons.”
Provo City Library, Provo, Utah

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Maine Student Book Awards

Posted by on Mar 30, 2017 in Book: The Eureka Key, Reviews | 0 comments

The Eureka Key

The Eureka Key pops up on the Maine Student Book Award list! Loud jubilation! State awards are always particularly exciting because the actual kid readers get to actually vote, and it’s even better to be nominated in your own state. Maine readers, I salute you!

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SLJ’s Best of 2016–Quick, Little Monkey!

Posted by on Jan 6, 2017 in Book: Quick Little Monkey, Marmosets, PIcture Books, Reviews | 0 comments

research, marmosetSo happy to learn that Quick, Little Monkey! is on School Library Journal’s list of the best children’s books of 2016. “Only a monster could look into those eyes and tell this book it couldn’t be on a Best of the Year list,” the reviewer says. This is how I feel about that!

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Review of Deadly Flowers

Posted by on Sep 16, 2016 in Book: Deadly Flowers, Reviews | 2 comments

Deadly Flowers

Children’s Literature has a nice review of Deadly Flowers. Lovely to be compared to Lloyd Alexander! Do kids read him anymore? It seems like I spent half my childhood in Prydain.

Rather than trusting no one, [Kata] learns to decipher who is trustworthy, and instead of blind obedience to a master, she starts to wonder if freedom from any master is possible. This journey through feudal Japan and its hero folklore is reminiscent of some of Lloyd Alexander’s works. Ninja fans and others will fall in love with this daring, determined, and silent warrior.

Read More